One of the Cheapest Ways to Invest in Silver Bullion

Today’s article is going to address one of the most common questions that we receive from our customers, and that is, “what is the cheapest way to invest in silver bullion?”  While there are many forms of silver bullion available in the marketplace, we’re going to limit our discussion today to some of the most common and recognized forms of silver bullion.

To begin with, what do we mean by silver bullion?  Silver bullion is essentially any form of silver, such as coins, bars, rounds, or ingots, that sell primarily for their silver value as opposed to their collectible or numismatic value.

As mentioned above, many forms of silver bullion exist, but it’s important to invest in silver bullion that is recognizable so that there’s a large and liquid market available when it comes time to sell.  As such, we’re going to highlight three silver coin options today that can generally be purchased for their silver value, or possibly even less!

The first option we’re going to discuss are 40% silver Kennedy half dollars.  With the exception of half dollars, in 1965 the U.S. debased silver from all coinage for general circulation.  In other words, dimes and quarters beginning in 1965 contain no silver content.  Half dollars weren’t left unscathed, as the silver content in these coins was reduced from 90% to 40%.  Silver was completely eliminated from half dollars in 1971.  These coins are in large supply and are commonly recognized by investors and collectors alike as containing 40% silver.

The second coin we’re going to highlight is also a U.S. issued silver coin.  Most individuals may not realize this, but nickels are primarily composed of copper.  During World War II, copper was needed for ammunition and was in relatively short supply, so the government made the decision to mint nickels with 35% silver content from 1942 – 1945. As such, these coins are commonly referred to as silver war nickels.  The coins are typically darker in color than standard nickels due to the tarnishing of silver over time.  The only coin minted during the above referenced years that does not contain silver content is the 1942 nickel without a mint mark.Silver War Nickel

The last coin we’re going to highlight is from our neighbors to the north.  Canadian dimes, quarters, half dollars, and silver dollars minted in 1967 or earlier contain 80% silver.  In year’s past, the Canadian border was relatively porous, so Americans and Canadians alike commonly traveled back and forth between the countries.  Furthermore, many Canadians have taken residency in the U.S. over the years.  As such, Canadian silver coins are in relatively large supply; however, because they’re issued from another country, these coins can generally be purchased for less than their U.S. counterparts.  It’s not uncommon to be able to find Canadian silver coins that can be purchased for the melt value of the coins.

In summary, while there are many forms of silver bullion that can be purchased inexpensively, three of the cheapest and most recognizable silver coins that can be acquired are 40% silver half dollars, silver war nickels, and Canadian silver coins.  Atlanta Gold & Coin Buyers typically has a fairly large supply of these coins in stock, and generally sells these coins for their melt value or less. We hope that you found this article helpful and welcome you to contact us at 404-236-9744 with any questions that you might have.

Tony Davis
Tony Davis